Things to Consider When Choosing a Next Gen Monitoring Tool

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How do you monitor your monitoring tools?

Performance monitoring tools have a 94% adoption rate and new research shows that most organizations use an average of three separate tools to monitor the growing number of applications in their IT environment. Yet 5 out of 10 IT pros are initially unsure what causes performance problems, which leads to lengthy and manual detective work. These are the findings of a new research report by Gleanster and DLT partner, SolarWinds.

How useless are your alerts?

If you thought you’d invested in the ideal monitoring tool that understands all aspects of your systems, end-to-end, and automatically can differentiate expected errors versus critical errors? Think again. For many IT teams, alerts are often utterly useless. Systems are often configured with out-of-date thresholds and communication disconnects can result in over-eager alerts. That’s because the people responsible for monitoring are busy cobbling together multiple monitoring tools designed for different subsystems in a complex architecture.

Most IT organizations have either standardized on their favorite vendor’s solution or have duct taped together a bunch of monitoring systems, one for the application developer and the other for database monitoring. Either way, a bunch of different reporting tools with separate dashboards, and each group trying to diagnose critical errors with only a portion of the information necessary is only going to lead to disconnect, delay and inefficiency.

It doesn’t have to be that way

The good news is, the vendor community has caught up to this complexity and offers comprehensive monitoring tools that provide out-of-the-box threshold alerts with automatic baselines, end-to-end visibility, and insight into system data in context with multiple vendors.

It’s an IT departments nirvana!

So how do you make it happen? Check out these key considerations for selecting a next generation monitoring tool from Gleanster Research.

Maya Smith Tech Writer